Cardinal and Ordinal Numbers in German Language

Cardinal and Ordinal Numbers in German Language

In German, cardinal numbers (which denote quantity or count) and ordinal numbers (which denote the order or position in a sequence) are used similarly to English. Here’s a breakdown of both:

Cardinal Numbers:

  1. null – zero
  2. eins – one
  3. zwei – two
  4. drei – three
  5. vier – four
  6. fünf – five
  7. sechs – six
  8. sieben – seven
  9. acht – eight
  10. neun – nine
  11. zehn – ten
  12. elf – eleven
  13. zwölf – twelve
  14. dreizehn – thirteen
  15. vierzehn – fourteen
  16. fünfzehn – fifteen
  17. sechzehn – sixteen
  18. siebzehn – seventeen
  19. achtzehn – eighteen
  20. neunzehn – nineteen
  21. zwanzig – twenty
  22. einundzwanzig – twenty-one
  23. dreißig – thirty
  24. vierzig – forty
  25. fünfzig – fifty
  26. sechzig – sixty
  27. siebzig – seventy
  28. achtzig – eighty
  29. neunzig – ninety
  30. hundert – one hundred
  31. tausend – one thousand
  32. million – million

For numbers beyond 20, German often combines the word for the tens place with the word for the ones place, such as “einundzwanzig” for 21, “dreiundvierzig” for 43, etc.

Ordinal Numbers:

  1. erste – first
  2. zweite – second
  3. dritte – third
  4. vierte – fourth
  5. fünfte – fifth
  6. sechste – sixth
  7. siebte – seventh
  8. achte – eighth
  9. neunte – ninth
  10. zehnte – tenth
  11. elfte – eleventh
  12. zwölfte – twelfth
  13. dreizehnte – thirteenth
  14. vierzehnte – fourteenth
  15. fünfzehnte – fifteenth
  16. sechzehnte – sixteenth
  17. siebzehnte – seventeenth
  18. achtzehnte – eighteenth
  19. neunzehnte – nineteenth
  20. zwanzigste – twentieth

To form ordinal numbers in German, you generally add “-te” to the end of the cardinal number, with some exceptions for the first few numbers.

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